Environmental Epidemiology

ISSN 2519-8289 (Online)

Introduction to infectious ecology

 

Dmitry Nikolaenko

 

Environmental Epidemiology, 2018, 12, 2-3, 3 - 629 (in Russian).

Infectious ecology - a new direction of scientific research. A new paradigm has been developed to study the nature of infection, infectious processes and infec­tious diseases. Infection is understood as a discrete property of the ecological sys­tem of microorganisms. Changes in the ecological organization of microorganisms can lead to a discrete activation of their pathogenic properties. There is what is called "infectious disease". The spectrum of such manifestations is large. Their specificity is associated with microorganisms and their epigeosystems (EGS). A new explanation of the nature of activation of pathogens is extremely important and curious in connection with climate change. Examples are given of the study of infectious diseases from new scientific positions (ebola, tularaemia, bluetongue disease and some others).

CONTENT

 

1. New direction in science

 

 

1.1. Infectious ecology as a new direction of scientific research

 

7

 

1.2. Evolution of infectious ecology

 

27

 

1.3. S-Theory: A New Look at Infections

 

47

 

2. Geomonitoring of diffusion processes and discrete activation of pathogens 

 

 

 

2.1. GIS and geomonitoring of infectious processes

 

71

 

2.2. Multidimensional system of geocoding information on infectious processes

 

85

 

2.3. Polygon for infectious geomonitoring

 

112

 

2.4. Dimensions of Cartosemantics and use GIS in infectious ecology

 

137

 

2.5. Spatial-temporal loci as a method of processing infectious information

 

141

 

2.6. Statistical data series and possible manipulation of infectious diseases information  

 

162

 

2.7. Database time and time of the infectious process: what is described on the basis of GIS?

177

 

3. Infectious diseases of the past  

 

 

3.1. Paleoepidemiology of infectious diseases as a new scientific direction

 

198

 

3.2. Anthrax in the Russian Empire: eyes wide shut

 

226

 

3.3. "Intermittent fever" and N. Toropov: development of new territories and morbidity

 

314

 

4. Infectious diseases of the present

 

 

4.1. Zoonotic hypothesis of the origin of the HIV/AIDS epidemic: a critical analysis

 

343

 

4.2. Tularemia and Vladimir Adamovich: geography and ecology of Francisella tularensis  

 

368

 

4.3. Epizootics of burrowing birds: the case of Riparia riparia

 

404

 

4.4. Glyphosate and Ebola: Herbicides and Discrete Activation of Pathogens

 

436

 

4.5. Bluetongue disease: pre-project notes

446

 

5. Infectious diseases of the future  

 

 

5.1. New infectious threats and old expert habits

 

462

 

5.2. Morphology of diffusion of HIV/AIDS and evolution of the morbidity structure

 

480

 

5.3. Prion diseases of warm-blooded animals: adaptation hypothesis

 

531

 

 

References

567